Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Love - Four Sail (1969 great us psychedelic rock - 2002 remastered reissue complete scans - Wave)



After having loved their debut, Da Capo, and Forever Changes I was a little skeptical when I first popped Foursail into my cd player. How could Arthur Lee possibly reform Love after coming off of an album that many consider one of rock 'n' roll's greatest? After listening to Foursail, I realize that the acoustic symphonies of Forever Changes are long gone, but replaced by a much more powerful, dynamic rock sound, reminiscent of Cream and Zeppelin at times. In strong contrast with Forever Changes, which was Arthur Lee's death letter to the world, Foursail abandons the longer lyrical patterns for shorter, yet equally witty lyrics. Jay Donnallen shines on lead guitar; every solo just booms with intensity and originality, which almost makes you forget the abscense of Johnny Echols. Still present are the complex rhythm changes that Arthur Lee loves so much, and shows that he can still execute to perfection. While Foursail is not the masterpiece that Forever Changes was, and not as experimental as Da Capo, there is still something to be said for just putting out an exceptionally "cool" album. The track listing does not contain anything of the magnitude of "You Set the Scene" (which I personally consider one of the greatest songs in rock n roll), yet songs like "August", "Robert Montgomery", and "Singing Cowboy" boast excellent guitar riffs, and lyrics that you just can't help but sing along to. "Good Times" is another song off of the album that really just stuck with me. Although the band is different, songs such as "Neil's Song" and "Dream" remind us that Arthur Lee is still at the helm, which means the lyrics are dark and mysterious, despite the campy, sing-songy feeling evoked by "Neil's Song". To cap off the album, Lee ends with "Always See Your Face", a beautiful song that blends the horn sounds of Forever Changes with his newer rock sound characteristic of the rest of the album. Foursail is not the experimental delight that Da Capo was, nor the everlasting classic that Forever Changes is. Keeping this in mind, Foursail is an essential for any Love fan, or any fan of late 60's acid rock. Lee still proves that he is more than just another psychedelic rock band with Foursail, putting his newly-formed band on the top of the rock pedestal of 1969. This album has been unfairly forgotten, and deserves (in my opinion)to earn recognition in the top 50 or so rock albums. Please explore this album and other works by Love so we can all experience the musical genius that was and still is Arthur Lee.(By "leopardskinpillbxht")

Tracklist
01 "August" — 5:00
02 "Your Friend and Mine - Neil's Song" — 3:40
03 "I'm With You" — 2:45
04 "Good Times" — 3:30
05 "Singing Cowboy" (Lee, Jay Donnellan) — 4:30
06 "Dream" — 2:49
07 "Robert Montgomery" — 3:34
08 "Nothing" — 4:44
09 "Talking in My Sleep" — 2:50
10 "Always See Your Face" — 3:30
Bonus Tracks
11 "Robert Montgomery" (alternate vocal) — 3:41
12 "Talking in My Sleep" (alternate mix) — 2:55
13 "Singing Cowboy" (unedited version) (Lee, Donnellan) — 5:52

All songs written and arranged by Arthur Lee, except where noted. 

Personnel:
Arthur Lee - rhythm guitar, piano, conga, harmonica, lead vocals, producer
Jay Donnellan - lead guitar
Frank Fayad - bass, backing vocals (06,07)
George Suranovich - drums (01,05 to 10), backing vocals (06,07)
Drachen Theaker - drums (02 to 04)


4 comments:

Paramecio said...

My favourite Love album. Masterpiece.

john said...

I have my favorite Love album but all Arthur had to do was sing and i would love whatever he released.

Anonymous said...

Thank You Mucho 4 this....Nappyrags

Steve O. said...

Suranovitch is the best. I heard "Four Sail" in early 1970 and played "August" at least 20 times. George's work still stands as the pinnacle of all "kit" drumming. With artists like Moon, Baker, Mitchell, Pert, Rich and many other icons of "The Sticks", this is quite a claim. If you disagree, please offer a superior track of "Lead Drumming".